100-Year-Old Way to Filter Rainwater in a Barrel

During our boiling, broiling, blistering summer of 2012 here in the Missouri Ozarks, water was a topic of conversation wherever we went. Creeks and ponds dried up (some never recovered) and the water table dropped, forcing a few neighbors to have their well pumps lowered or to even have deeper wells drilled.

Many folks shared memories of rain barrels, cisterns, hand pumps and drawing water with a well bucket as a child, usually on grandpa and grandma’s farm. Some said they’d never want to rely again on those old-time methods of getting water. But, at least they knew how it was done.

During a SHTF situation, pain could become an annoyance for some, but unbearable for others.

If doctors are scarce and medicine becomes even scarcer, this one little weed, found all over North America and similar to morphine, could be a saving grace.

It seems we have lost much practical knowledge in the last 50 or so years because we thought we’d never need it again. Now we are scrambling to relearn those simple know-hows.

A tattered, 4-inch thick, 1909 book I happily secured for $8 in a thrift store reveals, among umpteen-thousand other every-day skills, how to make homemade water filters. The instructions in “Household Discoveries and Mrs. Curtis’s Cookbook” are quite basic as everyone had a rain barrel back then and presumably knew how to filter rainwater. Now, 104 years later, I am thankful the authors had the foresight to preserve their knowledge for us, and pointed out that rainwater collected in barrels from a roof is a necessity in some locations, but also is best for laundry and “often more wholesome for drinking purposes than hard water.”

The “wholesome” observation applies to plants, too. I noticed during our 6-week dry spell (not a drop of rain) that I was only able to keep my vegetables alive with the garden hose – until our well, too, began sucking air. The pitiful potato, tomato and bean plants actually seemed petrified, like faded plastic decorations. Then, after a 2-hour rain shower, the plants miraculously leapt to life – vibrant, green and THRIVING. I did, too.

(Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t know about.)

In early June last year, my husband surprised me with a 425-gallon water tank so I could water with nutritious rainwater, although it was August before any measure of water was in the tank. When the elusive rains finally paused briefly overhead, I was out in it with my 2-gallon watering can, running and sloshing the water like a crazy woman onto our neglected trees far up the hill.

100-year-old instructions

For gardening, rainwater is, naturally, best unfiltered. But, for household use, the vintage book says the following instructions yield a cheap and easy way to make a filter just as good as a patent filter costing 10 times as much:

“Take a new vinegar barrel or an oak tub that has never been used, either a full cask or half size. Stand it on end raised on brick or stone from the ground. Insert a faucet near the bottom. Make a tight false bottom 3 or 4 inches from the bottom of the cask. Perforate this with small gimlet holes, and cover it with a piece of clean white canvas.


“Place on this false bottom a layer of clean pebbles 3 or 4 inches in thickness; next, a layer of clean washed sand and gravel; then coarsely granulated charcoal about the size of small peas. Charcoal made from hard maple is the best.

“After putting in a half bushel or so, pound it down firmly. Then put in more until the tub is filled within 1 foot of the top. Add a 3-inch layer of pebbles; and throw over the top a piece of canvas as a strainer. This canvas strainer can be removed and washed occasionally and the cask can be dumped out, pebbles cleansed and charcoal renewed every spring and fall, or once a year may be sufficient.

“This filter may be set in the cellar and used only for drinking water. Or it may be used in time of drought for filtering stagnant water, which would otherwise be unpalatable, for the use of stock. This also makes a good cider filter for the purpose of making vinegar. The cider should first be passed through cheese cloth to remove all coarser particles.

“Or a small cheap filter may be made from a flower pot. A fine sponge may be inserted in the hole and the pot filled about as directed for the above filter. It may be placed in the top of a jar, which will receive the filtered water.”

Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’t knowabout.

Free online reading

My copy of the 1,000-page book is stained and worn, I assume from many years of use in the house, barn and garden. Even though I could read the bright, white online version, I treasure my rag-tag book and am hanging onto it. I still have much to learn.

To read the free online version of Household Discoveries and Mrs. Curtis’s Cookbook that covers everything from how to eradicate vermin, salt fish and build a 5-hole privy, visit Household Discoveries on Open Library.org. Information on filtering water begins on page 108.

Linda Holliday lives in the Missouri Ozarks where she and her husband formed Well WaterBoy Products, a company devoted to helping people live more self-sufficiently off grid, and invented the WaterBuck Pump. A former newspaper editor and reporter, Holliday blogs for Mother Earth News, sharing her skills in modern homesteading, organic gardening and human-powered devices.

Preparedness Hacks: Once a nuke is heading your way, you might think that there isn’t much left to do, but you would be wrong!

Because we will show you America’s natural nuclear bunkers that are also EMP proof. When the sirens start wailing, all you need to do is pick the closest one to your home, where you can take cover before it hits.

Martial Law under a government with bad intentions can have devastating consequences. Is history about to repeat itself and will we face a violent enactment of martial law in the years ahead?

Martial Law under a government with bad intentions can have devastating consequences. Is history about to repeat itself and will we face a violent enactment of martial law in the years ahead?

Here are 10 ways to fool the authorities and escape with your life and family.A violent and horrifying life in a concentration camp is what you may face one day under martial law.

We’re not talking about a regional or short term enactment of martial law. We’re talking about martial law under a government with an agenda to root out and destroy any elements that are not in line with their specific agenda.

How many Jews learned the hard way in World War II that the Nazis hated Jews and wanted to exterminate them?

In a government collapse following any number of disastrous events that might befall a nation, we can bet that the next government to come to power in this day and age will need force, and a lot of it, in order to quell a rebellious people.

Force shows power and overwhelming violence spreads fear across a population. And there’s no better way to show force and enact fear into a people than to violently enforce martial law.

Making Sense of All These Cyberattacks

In World War 2, the Nazis set out to conquer Europe; it was part of the Nazi agenda before World War 2 ever began.

If it’s going to happen to us, we can bet that extensive planning and military operations that include secret government agents, computer hacking, weapons smuggling, and covert alliances are already taking place.

At the end, who will be the governing party that will enact martial law? It won’t be under an American flag. Not the flag of our founding fathers that is. Don’t get me wrong. The American flag may still fly — but if it does fly, it’s going to be dwarfed by a larger flag with any number of national or foreign symbols poised above it.

Dump Any Device That Contain The Words ”Smart” Or ”I”

Your smartphone can be tracked even if GPS, location services are turned off. According to Princeton researchers, the smartphone user wouldn’t even know their phone was being tracked.

  • Smartphones’ locations can still be tracked, even if all location services and GPS have been turned off. — Princeton, 2018
  • A security exploit uses a mix of phone and non-phone information sources to track a device’s location, suggesting your location may not be as secure as you thought. — Princeton, 2018

Smartphones can still be tracked even if location services and GPS are turned off, according to Princeton University researchers.

The team—Arsalan Mosenia, Xiaoliang Dai, Prateek Mittal, and Niraj Jha—combined information from phone-based and non-phone sources to determine a device’s location. The technique, called PinMe, shows it is possible to track a location even if the location services, GPS, and Wi-Fi are turned off.

Data used to track the device include the phone’s time zone and information from its sensors, like air pressure, a Princeton press release said. When mixed with public information like maps, a device’s location can be estimated without location services.

Since the sources that produce this data don’t require user permission to operate and only collect a small amount of data, the method is “virtually undetectable,” the release said.

Dumping all this devices will increase your chances to avoid being caught.

Escaping Martial Law

1. Run, Don’t Walk, Run

With death bearing down on your community, on your neighborhood, on your front door, it’s better to make a hasty retreat for the countryside than to wait too long and find out the hard way … that you waited too long to evacuate.

From the countryside, you can hide safely under the cover of the forest, and make plans and preparations for the next leg of your journey.

A large number of Jews were able to escape the Nazis by fleeing into the forests, surviving the weather and foraging for food (or just handouts of free food), and eventually escaping. Sometimes they had the help of “underground” elements, resistance fighters and their supporters.

2. Seek Cover and Stay Camouflaged

Jews who waited too long to evacuate, or moved too slowly, or didn’t do a good job hiding out, were rounded up, or simply shot where they were found. The key to not being found is to:

– Stay under cover (you don’t want to be spottedfrom a drone, helicopter, or plane circling in the air)

– Avoid “line of sight” (position yourself so that your path of travel isn’t visible to anyone scouring the land with binoculars; trees and tall brush can provide concealment from every direction; avoid meadows and open spaces).

– Be ready to belly crawl … slowly (not getting caught is of utmost importance; be ready to drop to your belly and crawl on all fours, stomach and head low to the ground, and move at a snail’s pace; moving extremely slow will help you avoid snapping twigs and also avoid shaking the brush or tall grass around you, movement which can give away your position to anyone close by).

– Be patient (if you have any questions or suspicions about a possible searching party trying to track your position, be ready to stop moving completely and simply lay right where you are for the next several hours — until the cover of dark perhaps — or when you feel it’s safe to start moving again).

– Hide well off trail (the further you can get from any noticeable trail to hide, or just to sleep, the better; if these are just soldiers acting on orders, they may not be too excited about slogging through a swamp or wetland, or climbing a steep hill of dense brush, which brings us to…)

3. Choose the Path of MOST Resistance

From your starting point, what is the hardest way into the wilderness? What has the most brush, the steepest gully, that is still passable? If authorities are not right on your tail, and you have a head start, consider taking a path that no one in their right mind would be likely to take.

It might take you 30 minutes to climb a 200 yard hillside through the woods, but if that hillside climb puts you on a path off the beaten track, you can increase the odds that you’ll never be found, and that no one is going to follow the path you have taken.

4. Cover Your Tracks

Soldiers acting on authorities to round up evacuees might not be well trained (or have any real training) in tracking. That said, you should be cautious along whatever path you take not to leave signs of your presence, and especially not to leave signs revealing the direction you are traveling.

Signs to avoid are:

– Broken branches (avoid breaking branches; even twigs breaking off brush as you pass by are tell tale “white” signs pointing to your presence)

– Flattened grass (crawling through an open area of grass comes with a danger; you may leave a trail of flattened grass pointing in your direction of travel; if you have time, and you have to travel through grass, for a short distance into the grass, turn at repeated points, and use your hands to stand the grass back up, so that it’s no longer flattened and conceals your path of travel)

– Foot marks in damp soil (be ever cautious about open areas of soil, especially damp soil; damp soil is a fast way to leave a shoe print revealing your direction of travel; step cautiously over and around open areas of soil to avoid leaving shoe prints).

– Camp fires (smoke from camp fires can alert people from miles away to your location and ashes from a camp fire on the ground can tell trackers just how long it’s been since you were there; as much as possible, avoid any camp fires until you are a very safe distance away; keep them short, brief, and very small when you do need one)

– Litter (don’t drop anything to signal your presence, from an empty matchbook to a cigarette lighter to garbage from your food supplies; bury everything you don’t want well off trail where it won’t be found)

5. Fool Any Pursuers

So you plan on entering the woods near a highway? Cross to the other side of the highway and break a number of branches and clear a path of brush and create what looks like a trail leading in the opposite direction you actually plan to travel.

Continue forward along that false trail you’ve started, and leave additional signs giving pursuers the impression that is the direction you or others are traveling.

Now go back to your original planned starting point, perhaps “choosing the path of most resistance” (see above), and head off in the opposite direction.

Pull this off and you’ve just made a safe getaway and any pursuers will be shortly later on a wild goose chase leading to nowhere.

– Now is a great time to litter. Remember that rule above about avoiding littering — well there is a time to litter, and that is when you want to use litter as a way to fool pursuers into believing you went one direction, or crossed a river, when you actually doubled back and went another way.

Consider dropping an empty matchbook and arranging things to look like a temporary camp site.

In one area, urinate (or pour water) on the ground, and then make foot prints in the damp soil, that look like you are walking in a certain direction.

Got an old shirt? Cut a length of paracord and tie it securely to a rock, and then tie both to a shirt. Wrap the rock in the shirt and then throw both over a narrow river you have no intention to cross (choose a point in the river where it would be a dangerous crossing) so that the rock and shirt fall on the other side of the river where the shirt is visible to anyone searching from your side of the river (dunk your shirt in the water to give it more weight prior to your toss — it should travel a few feet further than it might if dry)

In a short while any pursuers who see your shirt may be fooled into thinking you crossed over the river. By the time they cross (if they are even able to cross, remember this is a fast point of the river we’re talking about) and discover the rock tied to your shirt, and possibly realize they’ve been fooled, you may be far off in a different direction.

Make it more believable by making foot prints in a damp area of sand or dirt near the river bank that point to the river.

6. Only Carry the Essentials

If you’re prepared, and in reality everyone should be prepared, you would have had a Bug Out Bag packed and ready to go, though a lighter weight Bug Out Bag may be called for if you find that you need to make a hasty retreat and have a tough road ahead of you.

What are some ways you can shed pounds from your backpack?

When it comes to the outdoors, it’s common for people to bring more changes of clothing than they actually need. The more time you spend in the outdoors, and the more time you spend on any treks of any real distance, you’ll realize that you can get by in the same set of clothing just fine. Having a second outfit you can wear as an additional layer is recommended, as evening temperatures can drop, and you don’t want to freeze. The point of all this is that too many outfits will only bulk up your bag and add extra weight and only slow down your travel time.

Additional ways to shed pounds —

– Avoid carrying a tent — instead, carry a simple waterproof bivy sack. A bivy sack is a thin yet rugged bag designed to fit over a sleeping bag and keep you sheltered from the elements.

– Carry less water into the wilderness (unless traveling through dry areas where natural water sources are few or non-existent for several miles at a time — then you’ll want to carry a lot more water than normal); be sure to have a plan for procuring drinking water along the way.

– Choose a smaller flashlight that takes smaller batteries (but always have a few extra)

– Cut your emergency candle in half (have a 55 hour emergency candle? Take a hacksaw to it, and cut it in half to 22.5 hours of burn time)

– Pack calorie-rich freeze dried food or light weight high calorie survival food and be prepared to go longer between meals

– Include a plan to snack on edible insects; some of you are squeamish at this idea — but edible insects can provide enough calories and help you get by for a few extra hours or even days at a time, adding time and distance to your escape from otherwise captivity and possible death in a concentration camp.

Right now your goal is to just get away — you can hunt, fish, and trap once you are dozens of miles away or more into a remote area.

– As you move along the forest floor and or along a rivers edge, be ready to collect edible plants, roots, nuts, and berries — but be careful, many are poisonous and not edible. It may be a lot easier for you to recognize edible insects and make do with these instead of risking your life with plants, roots, nuts, and berries found in the forest.

Remember, the wrong plant or berry can be a fast way to an early death. Foraging is a skill that today can be learned by reading books on foraging for wild plants, taking classes, and then practicing what you have learned so that you are ready for a survival situation.

7. Be Careful What You Tell People

If you come across strangers, keep details about your travels to yourself. Unless they’re part of your group, no need to share details just in case these strangers you’re talking with are soon after caught by authorities and give up your location.

What about tracking dogs?

While tracking dogs may be a threat for some evacuees, a large scale evacuation into the countryside is likely to leave authorities short handed and short on adequately trained canine teams.

8. Press On and Keep Traveling

Feel like there’s enough distance between you and them? Don’t take any chances and be ready to spend a few more days and even weeks traveling into remote areas. Better safe than sorry.

Hunting pressure and large numbers of evacuees fleeing into the wilderness in several regions of the country will send native wildlife fleeing for remote areas where there is a lot less human activity. It is these remote areas that the hunting is likely to be best — especially hunting for bigger game like deer, elk, antelope, and moose.

9. Seek Out Remote Wilderness

The difference between the World War 2 Jews vs survivors from a tyrannical government that may one day come to power today is that the Jews had allied nations that they could flee to. In fact many fled Europe completely and made it to the U.S. and of course millions had help being relocated to the present day nation of Israel in the years following World War 2.

If we have to run from a tyrannical government that one day comes to power and enactsmartial law, we may not have any allied nations to flee to at all, and so the only real way to survive long term may be to seek out remote wilderness far off the beaten track, well under the cover of forest (gotta hide from those drones), as well as lands shielded by mountains (where there’s no roads, there’s no easy way for armies to move enemy soldiers in and out, putting the odds of escaping the clutches of tyranny and martial law in your favor).

10. Teach the Children

While the history books are being re-written by the new powers that be, while the White House lays in ruin and Lady Liberty is just a scattered mountain of debris and a face laying horizontally across the ground, there will be one book that stands the test of time, with a history that can and should be passed on to children. There may be a lot of debate and some people swear by it and others swear against it — but only in the last pages of the Bible and the many prophecies concerning the End of Days will any of this ever make any sense.

There are several more details on survival when it comes to martial law and being forced into a life of living off the land and living off what you and your family can carry on your backs. Unfortunately, this isn’t fiction and it’s something that has occurred more and more in recent years.

Refugees in war torn nations (do I need to make a list?) and other nations struck by catastrophic disasters (Haiti, for example) have sent survivors fleeing for the countryside or simply living in the ruins of their towns and villages and large tent cities that have bred crime and corruption along with dangers to women and children — and the fathers and brothers who would otherwise seek to protect them.

Conclusion

In war torn nations in the modern day, and regions turned to ruins by natural disasters, many have died from starvation and disease, and others from drinking contaminated water; others have fallen victim to gangs or been killed by rogue armies that have come to power, perhaps enforcing their own version of martial law.

It is a certainty that martial law will come to the US soon and will be followed by UK, Canada and the Western Nations. Best to be ready and not caught off guard,when  the day comes that martial law is implemented .

Perhaps Jesus said it best when he said:

“Be on guard, so that your hearts will not be weighted down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of life, and that day will not come on you suddenly like a trap; for it will come upon all those who dwell on the face of all the earth. But keep on the alert at all times, praying that you may have the strength to escape all these things that are about to take place, and to stand before the Son of Man.” – Luke 21:34-3.

How much life will change after a SHTF event. All of our common comforts that we take for granted will be gone. You’ll have to adapt or die!

This article is a long read but it’s interesting in the respect that it gives you an idea of just how much life will change after a SHTF event. All of our common comforts that we take for granted will be gone. You’ll have to adapt or die! “X-Beast”
I always remember my grandmother saying the “good ole days”, wasn’t all that good. I remember playing in the old chicken coop, smoke house, barn, & even the outhouse, all of them not used anymore in the 1970s. A fairly long read, but after reading this, I understand what she was talking about.

It’s one or two years after an EMP attack and you are safely tucked away in your retreat somewhere in the middle of nowhere. Your storage foods have mostly been used and your high tech electronics is useless. The really bad stuff is mostly past. Now it’s try to stay fed and alive and pray that civilization as you know it is coming back. You’re going to have to work your environment to live. Ever wonder what life might be like? What would it really be like to have no running water, electricity, sewer, newspaper or Internet? No supermarket or fire department close at hand?

I have a good imagination but I decided to talk to someone who would know first hand what it was like: my mother. She grew up on a homestead in the middle of Montana during the 1920s and 1930s. It was a two room Cottonwood cabin with the nearest neighbor three miles away. She was oldest at 9, so she was in charge of her brother and sister. This was her reality; I feel there are lessons here for the rest of us.

There was a Majestic stove that used wood and coal. The first person up at four thirty A.M., usually her father, would start the fire for breakfast. It was a comforting start to the day but your feet would get cold when you got out of bed. 

A crosscut saw and axe was used to cut wood for the stove and after that experience, you got pretty stingy with the firewood because you know what it takes to replace it. The old timers say that it warms you when you cut it, when you split it, and again when you burn it. The homes that were typical on homesteads and ranches of the era were smaller with lower ceilings than modern houses just so they could be heated easier. The saw and axe were not tools to try hurrying with. You set a steady pace and maintained it. A man in a hurry with an axe may loose some toes or worse. One side effect of the saw and axe use is that you are continuously hungry and will consume a huge amount of food. Lights in the cabin were old fashioned kerosene lamps. It was the kid’s job to trim the wicks, clean the chimneys and refill the reservoirs.

The privy was downhill from the house next to the corral and there was no toilet paper. Old newspaper, catalogs or magazines were used and in the summer a pan of barely warm water was there for hygiene. During a dark night, blizzard, or brown out from a dust storm, you followed the corral poles-no flashlights.

There were two springs close to the house that ran clear, clean, and cold water. The one right next to it was a “soft” water spring. It was great for washing clothes and felt smooth, almost slick, on your skin. If you drank from it, it would clean you out just as effectively as it cleaned clothes. Not all clean water is equal.

The second spring was a half mile from the cabin and it was cold, clear, and tasted wonderful. The spring itself was deep – an eight foot corral pole never hit bottom- and flowed through the year. It was from here that the kids would fill two barrels on a heavy duty sled with water for the house and the animals. They would lead the old white horse that was hitched to the sledge back to the buildings and distribute the water for people and animals. In the summer, they made two trips in the morning and maybe a third in the evening. In the winter, one trip in the morning and one in the evening. They did this alone.

Breakfast was a big meal because they’re going to be working hard. Usually there would be homemade sausage, eggs and either cornmeal mush or oatmeal. More food was prepared than what was going to be eaten right then. The extra food was left on the table under a dish towel and eaten as wanted during the day. When evening meal was cooked, any leftovers were reheated. The oatmeal or the mush was sliced and fried for supper. It was served with butter, syrup, honey or molasses.

The homemade sausage was from a quarter or half a hog. The grinder was a small kitchen grinder that clamped on the edge of a table and everybody took turns cranking. When all the hog had been ground, the sausage mix was added and kneaded in by hand. Then it was immediately fried into patties. The patties were placed, layer by layer, into a stone crock and covered with the rendered sausage grease. The patties were reheated as needed. The grease was used for gravies as well as re-cooking the patties. Occasionally a fresh slice of bread would be slathered with a layer of sausage grease and a large slice of fresh onion would top it off for quick sandwich. Nothing was wasted.

Some of their protein came from dried fish or beef. Usually this had to be soaked to remove the excess salt or lye. Then it was boiled. Leftovers would go into hash, fish patties, or potato cakes.
The kitchen garden ran mostly to root crops. Onion, turnip, rutabaga, potato and radishes grew under chicken wire. Rhubarb was canned for use as a winter tonic to stave off scurvy. Lettuce, corn, and other above ground crops suffered from deer, rats, and gumbo clay soil. Surprisingly, cabbage did well. The winter squash didn’t do much, only 2 or 3 gourds. Grasshoppers were controlled by the chickens and turkeys. There was endless hoeing.

Washing clothes required heating water on the stove, pouring it into three galvanized wash tubs-one for the homemade lye soap and scrub board, the other two for rinsing. Clothes were rinsed and wrung out by hand, then hung on a wire to dry in the air. Your hands became red and raw, your arms and shoulders sore beyond belief by the end of the wash. Wet clothing, especially wool, is heavy and the gray scum from the soap was hard to get out of the clothes.

Personal baths were in a galvanized wash tub screened by a sheet. In the winter it was difficult to haul, heat and handle the water so baths weren’t done often. Most people would do sponge baths.Everybody worked including the kids. There were always more chores to be done than time in the day. It wasn’t just this one family; it was the neighbors as well. You were judged first and foremost by your work ethic and then your honesty. This was critical because if you were found wanting in either department, the extra jobs that might pay cash money, a quarter of beef, hog or mutton would not be available. Further, the cooperation with your neighbors was the only assurance that if you needed help, you would get help. Nobody in the community could get by strictly on their own. A few tried. When they left, nobody missed them. You didn’t have to like someone to cooperate and work with him or her.

Several times a year people would get together for organized activities: barn raising, butcher bee, harvest, roofing, dance, or picnics. There were lots of picnics, usually in a creek bottom with cottonwoods for shade or sometimes at the church. Always, the women would have tables groaning with food, full coffee pots and, if they were lucky, maybe some lemonade. (Lemons were expensive and scarce) After the work (even for picnics, there was usually a project to be done first) came the socializing. Many times people would bring bedding and sleep out overnight, returning home the next day.

A half dozen families would get together for a butcher bee in the cold days of late fall. Cows were slaughtered first, then pigs, mutton, and finally chickens. Blood from some of the animals was collected in milk pails, kept warm on a stove to halt coagulation and salt added. Then it was canned for later use in blood dumplings, sausage or pudding. The hides were salted for later tanning; the feathers from the fowl were held for cleaning and used in pillows or mattresses. The skinned quarters of the animals would be dipped into cold salt brine and hung to finish cooling out so they could be taken home safely for processing. Nothing went to waste.

The most feared occurrence in the area was fire. If it got started, it wasn’t going out until it burned itself out. People could and did loose everything.

The most used weapon was the .22 single shot Winchester with .22 shorts. It was used to take the heads off pheasant, quail, rabbit and ducks. If you held low, the low powered round didn’t tear up the meat. The shooters, usually the kids, quickly learned sight picture and trigger control although they never heard those terms. If you took five rounds of ammunition, you better bring back the ammunition or a critter for the pot for each round expended. It was also a lot quieter and less expensive [in those days] than the .22 Long Rifle cartridges.

If you are trying to maintain a low profile, the odor of freshly baked bread can be detected in excess of three miles on a calm day. Especially by kids.

Twice a year the cabin was emptied of everything. The walls, floors, and ceilings were scrubbed with lye soap and a bristle brush. All the belongings were also cleaned before they came back into the house. This was pest control and it was needed until DDT became available. Bedbugs, lice, ticks and other creepy crawlies were a fact of life and were controlled by brute force. Failure to do so left you in misery and maybe ill.

Foods were stored in bug proof containers. The most popular was fifteen pound metal coffee cans with tight lids. These were for day to day use in the kitchen. (I still have one. It’s a family heirloom.) The next were barrels to hold the bulk foods like flour, sugar, corn meal, and rice. Everything was sealed or the vermin would get to it. There was always at least one, preferably two, months of food on hand. If the fall cash allowed, they would stock up for the entire winter before the first snowfall.

The closest thing to a cooler was a metal box in the kitchen floor. It had a very tight lid and was used to store milk, eggs and butter for a day or two. Butter was heavily salted on the outside to keep it from going rancid or melting. Buttermilk, cottage cheese and regular cheese was made from raw milk after collecting for a day or two. The box was relatively cool in the summer and did not freeze in the winter.

Mice and rats love humanity because we keep our environment warm and tend to be sloppy with food they like. Snakes love rats and mice so they were always around. If the kids were going to play outside, they would police the area with a hoe and a shovel. After killing and disposing of the rattlesnakes- there was always at least one-then they could play for a while in reasonable safety.

The mice and rats were controlled by traps, rocks from sling shots, cats and coyotes. The cats had a hard and usually short life because of the coyotes. The coyotes were barely controlled and seemed to be able to smell firearms at a distance. There were people who hunted the never-ending numbers for the bounty.

After chores were done, kid’s active imagination was used in their play. They didn’t have a lot of toys. There were a couple of dolls for the girls, a pocket knife and some marbles for the boy, and a whole lot of empty to fill. Their father’s beef calves were pretty gentle by the time they were sold at market – the kids rode them regularly. (Not a much fat on those calves but a lot of muscle.) They would look for arrow heads, lizards, and wild flowers. Chokecherry, buffalo berry, gooseberry and currants were picked for jelly and syrups. Sometimes the kids made chokecherry wine.

On a hot summer day in the afternoon, the shade on the east side of the house was treasured and the east wind, if it came, even more so. Adults hated hailstorms because of the destruction, kids loved them because they could collect the hail and make ice cream.

Childbirth was usually handled at a neighbor’s house with a midwife if you were lucky. If you got sick you were treated with ginger tea, honey, chicken soup or sulphur and molasses. Castor oil was used regularly as well. Wounds were cleaned with soap and disinfected with whisky. Mustard based poultices were often used for a variety of ills. Turpentine, mustard and lard was one that was applied to the chest for pneumonia or a hacking cough.

Contact with the outside world was an occasional trip to town for supplies using a wagon and team. A battery operated radio was used very sparingly in the evenings. A rechargeable car battery was used for power. School was a six mile walk one way and you brought your own lunch. One school teacher regularly put potatoes on the stove to bake and shared them with the kids. She was very well thought of by the kids and the parents.

These people were used to a limited amount of social interaction. They were used to no television, radio, or outside entertainment. They were used to having only three or four books. A fiddler or guitar player for a picnic or a dance was a wonderful thing to be enjoyed. Church was a social occasion as well as religious. 
The church ladies and their butter and egg money allowed most rural churches to be built and to prosper.

The men were required to do the heavy work but the ladies made it come together. The civilizing of the west sprang from these roots. Some of those ladies had spines of steel. They needed it. That’s a partial story of the homestead years. People were very independent, stubborn and strong but still needed the community and access to the technology of the outside world for salt, sugar, flour, spices, chicken feed, cloth, kerosene for the lights and of course, coffee. There are many more things I could list. Could they have found an alternative if something was unavailable? Maybe. How would you get salt or nitrates in Montana without importing? Does anyone know how to make kerosene? Coffee would be valued like gold. Roasted grain or chicory just didn’t cut it.

I don’t want to discourage people trying to prepare but rather to point out that generalized and practical knowledge along with a cooperative community is still needed for long term survival. Whatever shortcomings you may have, if you are part of a community, it is much more likely to be covered. The described community in this article was at least twenty to thirty miles across and included many farms and ranches as well as the town. Who your neighbors are, what type of people they are, and your relationship to them is one of the more important things to consider.

Were there fights, disagreements and other unpleasantness? Absolutely. Some of it was handled by neighbors, a minister or the sheriff. Some bad feelings lasted a lifetime. There were some people that were really bad by any standard and they were either the sheriff’s problem or they got sorted out by one of their prospective victims. 
These homesteaders had a rough life but they felt they had a great life and their way of life was shared by everyone they knew. They never went hungry, had great daylong picnics with the neighbors, and knew everyone personally within twenty miles. Every bit of pleasure or joy was treasured like a jewel since it was usually found in a sea of hard work. They worked hard, played hard and loved well. In our cushy life, we have many more “things” and “conveniences” than they ever did, but we lack the connection they had with their environment and community.

The biggest concern for our future: What happens if an event such as a solar flare, EMP, or a plague takes our society farther back than the early 1900s by wiping out our technology base. Consider the relatively bucolic scene just described and then add in some true post-apocalyptic hard cases. Some of the science fiction stories suddenly get much more realistic and scary. A comment out of a Star Trek scene comes to mind “In the fight between good and evil, good must be very, very good.”

Consider what kind of supplies might not be available at any cost just because there is no longer a manufacturing base or because there is no supply chain. In the 1900s they had the railroads as a lifeline from the industrial east.

One of the greatest advantages we have is access to a huge amount of information about our world, how things work and everything in our lives. We need to be smart enough to learn/understand as much as possible and store references for all the rest. Some of us don’t sleep well at night as we are well aware of how fragile our society and technological infrastructure is. Trying to live the homesteader’s life would be very painful for most of us. I would prefer not to. I hope and pray it doesn’t ever come to that.How long would it take us to rebuild the tools for recovery to the early 1900 levels?   Beans? There was almost always a pot of beans on the stove in the winter time. Chickens and a couple of milk cows provided needed food to balance the larder. They could not have supported a growing family without these two resources.

How much life will change after a SHTF event. All of our common comforts that we take for granted will be gone. You’ll have to adapt or die!

This article is a long read but it’s interesting in the respect that it gives you an idea of just how much life will change after a SHTF event. All of our common comforts that we take for granted will be gone. You’ll have to adapt or die! “X-Beast”
I always remember my grandmother saying the “good ole days”, wasn’t all that good. I remember playing in the old chicken coop, smoke house, barn, & even the outhouse, all of them not used anymore in the 1970s. A fairly long read, but after reading this, I understand what she was talking about.

It’s one or two years after an EMP attack and you are safely tucked away in your retreat somewhere in the middle of nowhere. Your storage foods have mostly been used and your high tech electronics is useless. The really bad stuff is mostly past. Now it’s try to stay fed and alive and pray that civilization as you know it is coming back. You’re going to have to work your environment to live. Ever wonder what life might be like? What would it really be like to have no running water, electricity, sewer, newspaper or Internet? No supermarket or fire department close at hand?

I have a good imagination but I decided to talk to someone who would know first hand what it was like: my mother. She grew up on a homestead in the middle of Montana during the 1920s and 1930s. It was a two room Cottonwood cabin with the nearest neighbor three miles away. She was oldest at 9, so she was in charge of her brother and sister. This was her reality; I feel there are lessons here for the rest of us.

There was a Majestic stove that used wood and coal. The first person up at four thirty A.M., usually her father, would start the fire for breakfast. It was a comforting start to the day but your feet would get cold when you got out of bed. 

A crosscut saw and axe was used to cut wood for the stove and after that experience, you got pretty stingy with the firewood because you know what it takes to replace it. The old timers say that it warms you when you cut it, when you split it, and again when you burn it. The homes that were typical on homesteads and ranches of the era were smaller with lower ceilings than modern houses just so they could be heated easier. The saw and axe were not tools to try hurrying with. You set a steady pace and maintained it. A man in a hurry with an axe may loose some toes or worse. One side effect of the saw and axe use is that you are continuously hungry and will consume a huge amount of food. Lights in the cabin were old fashioned kerosene lamps. It was the kid’s job to trim the wicks, clean the chimneys and refill the reservoirs.

The privy was downhill from the house next to the corral and there was no toilet paper. Old newspaper, catalogs or magazines were used and in the summer a pan of barely warm water was there for hygiene. During a dark night, blizzard, or brown out from a dust storm, you followed the corral poles-no flashlights.

There were two springs close to the house that ran clear, clean, and cold water. The one right next to it was a “soft” water spring. It was great for washing clothes and felt smooth, almost slick, on your skin. If you drank from it, it would clean you out just as effectively as it cleaned clothes. Not all clean water is equal.

The second spring was a half mile from the cabin and it was cold, clear, and tasted wonderful. The spring itself was deep – an eight foot corral pole never hit bottom- and flowed through the year. It was from here that the kids would fill two barrels on a heavy duty sled with water for the house and the animals. They would lead the old white horse that was hitched to the sledge back to the buildings and distribute the water for people and animals. In the summer, they made two trips in the morning and maybe a third in the evening. In the winter, one trip in the morning and one in the evening. They did this alone.

Breakfast was a big meal because they’re going to be working hard. Usually there would be homemade sausage, eggs and either cornmeal mush or oatmeal. More food was prepared than what was going to be eaten right then. The extra food was left on the table under a dish towel and eaten as wanted during the day. When evening meal was cooked, any leftovers were reheated. The oatmeal or the mush was sliced and fried for supper. It was served with butter, syrup, honey or molasses.

The homemade sausage was from a quarter or half a hog. The grinder was a small kitchen grinder that clamped on the edge of a table and everybody took turns cranking. When all the hog had been ground, the sausage mix was added and kneaded in by hand. Then it was immediately fried into patties. The patties were placed, layer by layer, into a stone crock and covered with the rendered sausage grease. The patties were reheated as needed. The grease was used for gravies as well as re-cooking the patties. Occasionally a fresh slice of bread would be slathered with a layer of sausage grease and a large slice of fresh onion would top it off for quick sandwich. Nothing was wasted.

Some of their protein came from dried fish or beef. Usually this had to be soaked to remove the excess salt or lye. Then it was boiled. Leftovers would go into hash, fish patties, or potato cakes.
The kitchen garden ran mostly to root crops. Onion, turnip, rutabaga, potato and radishes grew under chicken wire. Rhubarb was canned for use as a winter tonic to stave off scurvy. Lettuce, corn, and other above ground crops suffered from deer, rats, and gumbo clay soil. Surprisingly, cabbage did well. The winter squash didn’t do much, only 2 or 3 gourds. Grasshoppers were controlled by the chickens and turkeys. There was endless hoeing.

Washing clothes required heating water on the stove, pouring it into three galvanized wash tubs-one for the homemade lye soap and scrub board, the other two for rinsing. Clothes were rinsed and wrung out by hand, then hung on a wire to dry in the air. Your hands became red and raw, your arms and shoulders sore beyond belief by the end of the wash. Wet clothing, especially wool, is heavy and the gray scum from the soap was hard to get out of the clothes.

Personal baths were in a galvanized wash tub screened by a sheet. In the winter it was difficult to haul, heat and handle the water so baths weren’t done often. Most people would do sponge baths.Everybody worked including the kids. There were always more chores to be done than time in the day. It wasn’t just this one family; it was the neighbors as well. You were judged first and foremost by your work ethic and then your honesty. This was critical because if you were found wanting in either department, the extra jobs that might pay cash money, a quarter of beef, hog or mutton would not be available. Further, the cooperation with your neighbors was the only assurance that if you needed help, you would get help. Nobody in the community could get by strictly on their own. A few tried. When they left, nobody missed them. You didn’t have to like someone to cooperate and work with him or her.

Several times a year people would get together for organized activities: barn raising, butcher bee, harvest, roofing, dance, or picnics. There were lots of picnics, usually in a creek bottom with cottonwoods for shade or sometimes at the church. Always, the women would have tables groaning with food, full coffee pots and, if they were lucky, maybe some lemonade. (Lemons were expensive and scarce) After the work (even for picnics, there was usually a project to be done first) came the socializing. Many times people would bring bedding and sleep out overnight, returning home the next day.

A half dozen families would get together for a butcher bee in the cold days of late fall. Cows were slaughtered first, then pigs, mutton, and finally chickens. Blood from some of the animals was collected in milk pails, kept warm on a stove to halt coagulation and salt added. Then it was canned for later use in blood dumplings, sausage or pudding. The hides were salted for later tanning; the feathers from the fowl were held for cleaning and used in pillows or mattresses. The skinned quarters of the animals would be dipped into cold salt brine and hung to finish cooling out so they could be taken home safely for processing. Nothing went to waste.

The most feared occurrence in the area was fire. If it got started, it wasn’t going out until it burned itself out. People could and did loose everything.

The most used weapon was the .22 single shot Winchester with .22 shorts. It was used to take the heads off pheasant, quail, rabbit and ducks. If you held low, the low powered round didn’t tear up the meat. The shooters, usually the kids, quickly learned sight picture and trigger control although they never heard those terms. If you took five rounds of ammunition, you better bring back the ammunition or a critter for the pot for each round expended. It was also a lot quieter and less expensive [in those days] than the .22 Long Rifle cartridges.

If you are trying to maintain a low profile, the odor of freshly baked bread can be detected in excess of three miles on a calm day. Especially by kids.

Twice a year the cabin was emptied of everything. The walls, floors, and ceilings were scrubbed with lye soap and a bristle brush. All the belongings were also cleaned before they came back into the house. This was pest control and it was needed until DDT became available. Bedbugs, lice, ticks and other creepy crawlies were a fact of life and were controlled by brute force. Failure to do so left you in misery and maybe ill.

Foods were stored in bug proof containers. The most popular was fifteen pound metal coffee cans with tight lids. These were for day to day use in the kitchen. (I still have one. It’s a family heirloom.) The next were barrels to hold the bulk foods like flour, sugar, corn meal, and rice. Everything was sealed or the vermin would get to it. There was always at least one, preferably two, months of food on hand. If the fall cash allowed, they would stock up for the entire winter before the first snowfall.

The closest thing to a cooler was a metal box in the kitchen floor. It had a very tight lid and was used to store milk, eggs and butter for a day or two. Butter was heavily salted on the outside to keep it from going rancid or melting. Buttermilk, cottage cheese and regular cheese was made from raw milk after collecting for a day or two. The box was relatively cool in the summer and did not freeze in the winter.

Mice and rats love humanity because we keep our environment warm and tend to be sloppy with food they like. Snakes love rats and mice so they were always around. If the kids were going to play outside, they would police the area with a hoe and a shovel. After killing and disposing of the rattlesnakes- there was always at least one-then they could play for a while in reasonable safety.

The mice and rats were controlled by traps, rocks from sling shots, cats and coyotes. The cats had a hard and usually short life because of the coyotes. The coyotes were barely controlled and seemed to be able to smell firearms at a distance. There were people who hunted the never-ending numbers for the bounty.

After chores were done, kid’s active imagination was used in their play. They didn’t have a lot of toys. There were a couple of dolls for the girls, a pocket knife and some marbles for the boy, and a whole lot of empty to fill. Their father’s beef calves were pretty gentle by the time they were sold at market – the kids rode them regularly. (Not a much fat on those calves but a lot of muscle.) They would look for arrow heads, lizards, and wild flowers. Chokecherry, buffalo berry, gooseberry and currants were picked for jelly and syrups. Sometimes the kids made chokecherry wine.

On a hot summer day in the afternoon, the shade on the east side of the house was treasured and the east wind, if it came, even more so. Adults hated hailstorms because of the destruction, kids loved them because they could collect the hail and make ice cream.

Childbirth was usually handled at a neighbor’s house with a midwife if you were lucky. If you got sick you were treated with ginger tea, honey, chicken soup or sulphur and molasses. Castor oil was used regularly as well. Wounds were cleaned with soap and disinfected with whisky. Mustard based poultices were often used for a variety of ills. Turpentine, mustard and lard was one that was applied to the chest for pneumonia or a hacking cough.

Contact with the outside world was an occasional trip to town for supplies using a wagon and team. A battery operated radio was used very sparingly in the evenings. A rechargeable car battery was used for power. School was a six mile walk one way and you brought your own lunch. One school teacher regularly put potatoes on the stove to bake and shared them with the kids. She was very well thought of by the kids and the parents.

These people were used to a limited amount of social interaction. They were used to no television, radio, or outside entertainment. They were used to having only three or four books. A fiddler or guitar player for a picnic or a dance was a wonderful thing to be enjoyed. Church was a social occasion as well as religious. 
The church ladies and their butter and egg money allowed most rural churches to be built and to prosper.

The men were required to do the heavy work but the ladies made it come together. The civilizing of the west sprang from these roots. Some of those ladies had spines of steel. They needed it. That’s a partial story of the homestead years. People were very independent, stubborn and strong but still needed the community and access to the technology of the outside world for salt, sugar, flour, spices, chicken feed, cloth, kerosene for the lights and of course, coffee. There are many more things I could list. Could they have found an alternative if something was unavailable? Maybe. How would you get salt or nitrates in Montana without importing? Does anyone know how to make kerosene? Coffee would be valued like gold. Roasted grain or chicory just didn’t cut it.

I don’t want to discourage people trying to prepare but rather to point out that generalized and practical knowledge along with a cooperative community is still needed for long term survival. Whatever shortcomings you may have, if you are part of a community, it is much more likely to be covered. The described community in this article was at least twenty to thirty miles across and included many farms and ranches as well as the town. Who your neighbors are, what type of people they are, and your relationship to them is one of the more important things to consider.

Were there fights, disagreements and other unpleasantness? Absolutely. Some of it was handled by neighbors, a minister or the sheriff. Some bad feelings lasted a lifetime. There were some people that were really bad by any standard and they were either the sheriff’s problem or they got sorted out by one of their prospective victims. 
These homesteaders had a rough life but they felt they had a great life and their way of life was shared by everyone they knew. They never went hungry, had great daylong picnics with the neighbors, and knew everyone personally within twenty miles. Every bit of pleasure or joy was treasured like a jewel since it was usually found in a sea of hard work. They worked hard, played hard and loved well. In our cushy life, we have many more “things” and “conveniences” than they ever did, but we lack the connection they had with their environment and community.

The biggest concern for our future: What happens if an event such as a solar flare, EMP, or a plague takes our society farther back than the early 1900s by wiping out our technology base. Consider the relatively bucolic scene just described and then add in some true post-apocalyptic hard cases. Some of the science fiction stories suddenly get much more realistic and scary. A comment out of a Star Trek scene comes to mind “In the fight between good and evil, good must be very, very good.”

Consider what kind of supplies might not be available at any cost just because there is no longer a manufacturing base or because there is no supply chain. In the 1900s they had the railroads as a lifeline from the industrial east.

One of the greatest advantages we have is access to a huge amount of information about our world, how things work and everything in our lives. We need to be smart enough to learn/understand as much as possible and store references for all the rest. Some of us don’t sleep well at night as we are well aware of how fragile our society and technological infrastructure is. Trying to live the homesteader’s life would be very painful for most of us. I would prefer not to. I hope and pray it doesn’t ever come to that.How long would it take us to rebuild the tools for recovery to the early 1900 levels?   Beans? There was almost always a pot of beans on the stove in the winter time. Chickens and a couple of milk cows provided needed food to balance the larder. They could not have supported a growing family without these two resources.

The Best Way to Stay Calm During A SHTF Event Is to Always be Prepared, Both Mentally And Physically, For Such An Eventuality

If you’re into watching Hollywood movies, you’ve probably noticed how the vast majority of people react in a SHTF scenario: pretty much like those famous fainting goats.

Okay, maybe I am exaggerating a bit, for the sake of argument, but generally speaking, fear is the mind killer, and when it comes to unexpected and traumatic events, such as car accidents, people’s minds tend to shut off. One thing that preppers often overlook is mental survival, or how to stay cool, calm and collected in a survival situation.

Feeding on one’s emotions during a SHTF situation will always lead to poor decision making, and in a survival scenario this is very dangerous. When your life (and maybe others’) may depend on your next decision, you have to stay as calm and focused as humanly possible.

To give you an interesting factoid, in a disaster scenario, approximately 80 percent of people basically freeze (the fainting-goat effect, a severe form of panic), while 10 percent “just” panic, which leaves a mere 10 percent actually capable to respond in a meaningful way and take action.

To understand the mechanisms of fear and panic during stressful situations, thus learning how to control your mind processes, you must know that, in times of stress, your body produces various hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline, which are well known to the general public due to their effect, often called “flight or fight response“.

When your body starts pumping out cortisol and adrenaline, your energy level and stamina get a significant boost; however, when the ‘drugs’ wear off, you’ll be confronted with both mental and physical fatigue.

It’s also worth noticing that cortisol, which is a stress hormone, causes the brain’s pre-frontal cortex and hippo-campus to malfunction, to slow down basically, which means that fear really is the mind killer, i.e. under very stressful conditions, you’re literally mentally impaired.

To make it real simple, in a “flight or fight” situation, your reptilian brain (amygdala) takes over your frontal cortex, which means you’ll be answering to a crisis situation with emotions instead of logic and reason.

This is why when people panic, they tend to react rather stupid (if at all), and it’s a “no brainer” (pun intended) that this kind of approach in a SHTF scenario is not the best, to put it mildly.

That’s why being capable of controlling your emotional state, thus being able to remain calm, cool and collected in a survival situation is paramount, as it can make the difference between life and death.

The thing is, when it comes to survival, your ability to withstand stress in SHTF situations trumps physical fitness, i.e. it’s not always the strong who are the best at handling their emotions during emergencies. If you don’t have a positive mind set, your physical skills will most likely render useless in survival situations.

Keep in mind that survival is essentially a state of mind, as your brain is obviously the best survival toolyou’ve ever had and your most valuable asset, hence in order to survive a SHTF event, you’ll have to understand the key ingredient of survival: the proper frame of mind.

With the right attitude, anything is possible, as the mind has the power to push the body to do extraordinary things. As records show, especially in emergency wilderness situations, people managed to stay alive on will alone, i.e. one’s will to live made survival possible against all odds on countless occasions.

Here are some tips and tricks to help keeping your mind in peak condition.

First, never play the blame game, as in never blame yourself. Even if it may be factually true (as in: it was your decision which led to a SHTF event), it’s a completely wrong and unproductive line of thinking, that would only render you ineffective and miserable. Try to concentrate on what to do next, how to get out of that hairy situation. It doesn’t matter anymore what would have happened had you acted differently or made a different decision, it’s all water under the bridge.

A very simple strategy that often has a huge impact, as in great results with regard to keeping one calm during a tough situation, is to reaffirm yourself. That can be done rather easily by creating a mantra, a certain phrase in your head, that can boost your spirits during a crisis.

Think along the lines of “keep going”, “never quit”, “I am one with the Force and the Force is with me” (this works for Star Wars fans) or whatever suits you better. The trick is to switch your mindset, to focus on positive things to think about during a crisis.

Realistic thinking and positive statements go a long way survival wise, as opposed to thoughts that make you depressed and fearful. You must challenge those thoughts with every fiber of your ego. However, you shouldn’t pretend to be someone else, i.e. a person devoid of emotions.

Address your emotions, acknowledge them as they come, don’t try to ignore them; just accept them, handle them, overcome them  and then move on.

Remember that saying about idle hands are devil’s playground? The same goes for your mind in a SHTF scenario. To prevent your mind from turning onto itself, keep it busy, think of creative ways to ease your situation or to salvage plans, cook, tinker with your gear, fix your shelter, think critically about an ardent issue.

And I must emphasize it again, stay positive, focus on positive outcomes and positive things. Another thing to contemplate is that a healthy mind usually resides in a healthy body, which means that it’s much easier to stay positive and “think happy thoughts” if you’re rested, well fed and in good physical condition, compared to the opposite.

Regardless of how bad the problem you’re facing is, you can stay calm by maintaining perspective. For example, if you’ve lost your food supply to wild animals, don’t despair, it could’ve been worse: you weren’t there, during the robbery I mean, so you weren’t injured/eaten yourself.

You see where this is going, right?

A very effective way to regain self-control in a SHTF situation, i.e. to stay calm, is to focus on breathing. There’s a breathing system called the 4-7-8 method. It goes something like this:

  1. Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.
  2. Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of 4.
  3. Hold your breath for a count of 7.
  4. Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of 8.
  5. This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of 4 breaths.

However, in this writer’s opinion, the best way to stay calm during a SHTF event is to always be prepared, both mentally and physically, for such an eventuality.

Plan ahead, train hard, eat the right things and acquire as many survival skills as you can. Read and learn survival literature, like this website, watch videos, and get hands on training, as there’s no real substitute for real-life experiences.

Oh, and don’t forget your emergency kit.

I hope the article helped. If you’re having questions or issues, don’t hesitate to comment in the dedicated section below.

ALIEN ARTIFACT: We No Longer Need To Ask For Disclosure When Religion And Science Is Giving Us Confirmation

When I attended Contact in the Desert, I had many opportunities to speak candidly with many well-known investigators and experts about my effort to bring forward the idea that extra terrestrial confirmation is taking place, with the data dumps of once classified UFO material and the confident stand from science about the discovery of extra- terrestrial life.

One of the biggest buzz words at the gathering was “soft disclosure” where discoveries from NASA and official positions of the Vatican indicate that the world is slowly being prepared for full disclosure of extra-terrestrials.

However, I confessed that I thought the word disclosure is more of a political pipe dream by certain people who have gone from UFO hobbyists to highly-sought after experts on matters of exobiology.

The way to the truth is through confirmation as disclosure not only includes a declaration by the Military Industrial Complex and the President that for 70 years, they have covered up UFO’s and aliens and have allowed the continued abduction and experiments to happen.

I really don’t think you will get an admission of lies from the government.

Rather than seeking out and exposing the liars, perhaps it is now time to confirm the truth.

Last October, it was revealed the Vatican had a secret that they had uncovered from the estimated 53 miles of books that exist in their library, about our origins and the recent reconstruction of a leather manuscript that had been estimated to be more than 4,000 years old. The manuscript was discovered in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

The most important thing about this manuscript is that it was announced that the ancient scroll was reconstructed and that it contained religious spells as well as colorful depictions of divine and supernatural beings, predating those found in the Book of the Dead manuscripts.

The text has been found on rolls that were created between 2,300 BC and 2,000 BC – from the late Old Kingdom up to the early Middle Kingdom. It contains many new religious texts, including a large pictorial-textual segment from the so-called Book of Two Ways, known from the floorboard decorations of Middle Kingdom coffins, as well as religious spells formulated in the first-person singular, probably intended for recitation by a priest.

The text illustrates a holy place in the stars that is protected by multiple gates and powerful extra-terrestrial guardians. They are said to be supernatural beings with immense magical powers.

Americans spend a huge amount of money on batteries each year, whether that is standard AA or AAA batteries that we all burn through as if they’re going out of fashion, or something more specific like a car or laptop battery.

What would you say if you could learn a simple technique to cut those costs down to a fraction of the price you’re currently paying? Could your household budget benefit from that kind of cost saving from his reconditioning method? Of course!

Watch the video below to find out everything !!!

There are many writers and scholars that believe the ancients based their religious beliefs on appearances in the heavens and the star constellation Cygnus or the Swan.

This is a very important point to ponder and here is why.

For nearly five years, NASA’s Kepler mission measured the brightness of objects within a large area in the direction of the constellations Cygnus and Lyrae. The program’s targets were primarily selected to address the Kepler mission goals of discovering Earth-like planets orbiting other stars. Kepler targeted over 150, 000 stars, primarily with a 30-minute observing cadence, leading to over 2.5-billion data points per year . The Kepler mission’s data processing and identification of transiting planet candidates was done in an automated manner through sophisticated computer algorithms.

One of the goals of the planet finders was to look for errant light or audio transmissions from any of the planets observed in 30 day segments of light curvature.

The Planet Hunters project has now discovered hundreds of exoplanet candidates, including several confirmed systems that may yield life or may have evidence of alien megastructures that have been constructed by extra-terrestrial intelligence.

One of the more intriguing discoveries is a star called KIC 8462852 or Tabby’s Star.

The more scientists learn about “Tabby’s Star,” the more mysterious the bizarre object gets. Newly analyzed observations by NASA’s planet-hunting Kepler space telescope show that the star KIC 8462852, whose occasional, dramatic dips in brightness still have astronomers baffled, is now dimming again.

“Tabby’s star” has dimmed like this several times before, prompting some researchers to suggest that the megastructures of an advanced alien civilization might be blocking its light.

The star is 300 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus.

KIC 8462852 was first noticed to be dipping in brightness at seemingly random intervals between 2011 and 2013 by NASA’s Kepler telescope. Kepler, launched to observe the stellar dimmings caused when an exoplanet passes in front of its star, revealed the dimming of Tabby’s star was much more erratic than a typical planetary transit. It was also more extreme, with its brightness sometimes dropping by as much as 20%. This was not the passage of a small circular planet, but of something much larger and more irregular.

The dips observed from Tabby’s Star are quite steep, which is something natural phenomena cannot easily account for.

Now think back to the Vatican revelation about the ancient manuscript and The Book of Two Ways where it states there is holy place in the stars that is protected by multiple gates and powerful extra-terrestrial guardians.

What if the gates and guardians are metaphors for megastructures constructed by extra-terrestrial beings?

Two years ago it was announced that Tabby’s Star was acting in a peculiar manner and it was later proposed that this star had some sort of megastructure surrounding it.

This discovery has now generated a controversial theory that what is out there is a Dyson Sphere or a Dyson Swarm which is quite literally a shell of protection in order to preserve and or use the energy from the star.

A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical megastructure that completely encompasses a star and hence captures most or all of its power output. It was first described by Olaf Stapledon in his science fiction novel, “Star Maker.”

The concept was later popularly adopted by Freeman Dyson. Dyson speculated such structures would be the logical consequence of the long-term survival and escalating energy needs of a technological civilization, and proposed that searching for evidence of the existence of such structures might lead to the detection of advanced intelligent extra-terrestrial life.

As this star’s intensity dips again the idea of an advanced extraterrestrial race constructing an outer shell around a star is promising; however, there is yet another opportunity to study another alien artifact that is set to pass near the earth this summer.

A mysterious object, 1991 VG, which has left scientists scratching their heads since it was first discovered by astronomer James Scotti in November 6, 1991, will pass Earth in the summer of 2017. Based on its unusual features and properties, some scientists considered 1991 VG a candidate object in the ongoing search for an alien spacecraft or probe in our solar system at the time it was first discovered.

Scotti discovered the mysterious, small, fast moving space object with unusual features in November 1991 while searching the skies for asteroids at the University of Arizona’s Kitt Peak National observatory.

The object, only about 10 meters in diameter, exhibited strange properties that raised the astronomer’s suspicion. It moved faster than expected for a space object its size and had an unusually fast rate of rotation. It also exhibited an anomalous pattern of brightness variation that suggested it was not an ordinary main-belt asteroid.

Scotti tracked the mysterious object for two nights, collecting data needed to plot its orbit. He was surprised to find that it had a heliocentric orbit strikingly similar to Earth’s. He was also surprised to find that it was due to brush past Earth at a distance of 280,000 miles the following month and that it had already passed close to Earth at least once in the past. Data plotting 1991 VG’s orbital trajectory showed that it passed Earth around March 1975.

In short, 1991 VG’s combination of properties and features suggested to Scotti and his colleagues that it could be an artificial object built by someone and launched to space. But although the scientists admitted frankly that 1991 VG could be an alien spacecraft or probe operating in our solar system, they were unwilling to concede the suggestion without overwhelming evidence supporting it.

I guess as it moves closer to our earth we will witness more proof of possible artificial structures and or probes passing by our planet that could very well confirm observance by and extra-terrestrial civilization.

Solar energy is a renewable source of energy with has many benefits.

The best thing is that you’ll save money on you electric bill.

To build your own solar panel almost for free, you’ll need to watch this video

Meanwhile, sounds from space have generated headlines around the world and once again scientists are trying to comprehend just what they are listening too.

Researchers have wondered about the source of fast radio bursts, or FRBs, since they discovered the strange, powerful blasts of radio light in the skies in 2007. Each burst lasts for just a fraction of a second but releases more energy in that time than the sun will radiate in 10,000 years. A recent study speculated that these bursts could come from radio transmitters used to propel aliens across the skies.

There have been many sounds that have been detected that really have no explanation and that have remained unknown for some time.

They appear to be artificial in origin, according to new studies, and could be coming from a gigantic radio transmitter built by intelligent aliens.

By the time the radio waves arrive at our telescopes, the shorter waves arrive just before the longer ones. By measuring the time delay between the short waves and the longer ones, astronomers can work out how much matter a given burst has travelled through on its journey from whatever made it, to our telescope.

When I held a panel discussion with Jacques Vallee, Linda Moulten Howe, Mike Bara, Michael Salla and John DeSouza at the gathering for Contact in the Desert, I stated that we no longer need to ask for disclosure when religion and science is giving us conformation.

People seeking “disclosure” seem to think it is for our own good. They think that learning the truth will put us on the path to free energy machines, miraculous health cures and all sorts of other New Age ideas that sound good in a pink fuzzy way, but end up dying when faced with the truth. The truth may be that the phenomenon is not easily put in a box and disclosure will most definitely not happen in the way we seem to think it will.

There are many things in government that are known as “Core Secrets.” Allegedly, Core Secrets are only given to the President on a “Need to Know Basis.” That means, some Intelligence the President knows nothing about. From what is indicated in several intelligence reports, the President does not know the “core secret” of the alien presence. He only knows what you and I probably have been privileged to learn from Ground Truth Documents that are seen by very select few, and they hold the secrets.

There is no automatic clearance for access to any doomsday scenario provided to the President. If the President makes a speech or if he does disclose the alien presence, it will be disclosed directly from Intelligence and even then, that information is highly-suspect and carefully planned and thought out to prevent mass hysteria from the general public. All core intelligence information is protected, even if it is bogus. The reasoning smacks of dark creepiness.

Core intelligence is always somehow linked to all “doomsday blueprint” Intelligence cores. Core intelligence that would reveal an alien presence, possible alien intervention and alien attack and or invasion eventually arrives at the possibility of planetary annihilation. It unfortunately seems like some pseudo-religious scorched earth scenario where civilization must perish to protect itself from an alien threat. This is one possibility as to why full objective disclosure cannot happen.

There has always been the worry that religions would crumble if an alien presence was revealed but surprisingly of all things, religion and beliefs in a higher being may not receive a big cosmic dent after all according to experts.

We have all heard the speculation that aliens are fallen angels and they will convince us to worship them as gods.

The Bible, Koran and other sacred texts of the world’s major religions stress God’s special concern for humanity and for Earth. So the discovery of aliens, microbes on Mars, or signals from an intelligent civilization in another solar system, might seem threatening by implying we and our planet aren’t all that special.

However, we have to keep in mind that religious faith remains strong in much of the world despite scientific advances showing that Earth is not the center of the universe, and that our planet’s organisms were not created in their present form but rather evolved over billions of years. So it’s likely that religion would also weather any storms caused by the detection of E.T., researchers say.

Furthermore, the news that we’re not alone in the universe likely wouldn’t come as a huge shock, because large numbers of people around the world already believe that extra-terrestrials are out there somewhere.

Homemade Booby Traps: Enter At Your Own Risk- Setting Up Any Of The Following Traps In And Around Your Home Is Highly Illegal. These Examples Are For Illustrative Purposes ONLY To Prepare You For SHTF

A survivalist homemade booby trap is a device intended to automatically detect, scare, injure or kill.

To protect your homestead from unsuspecting threats.

For our purposes, a threat is anyone trying to enter our property or homes without your permission.

Thieves, bandits, gangs, etc.

During times of normalcy, it’s essential to keep the booby traps to the non-lethal, non-threatening sort. Simple alarm trip wires and such.

Yet, when SHTF…all bets are off…

So we will first cover 2 alert based traps. 

Then several outdoor homemade booby traps and finally share a few home entrance booby traps.

Remember: In order for any of these booby traps to work, they must be discreet and out of sight of its intended victim.

Alarm Trip Wires and Booby Traps

Your current focus should be on traps that alert you to intruders.

Traps that allow you to either hide, fight or get away.

1 – The Air Horn Trip Wire Booby Trap

First up is an air horn alarm tripwire.

This is a perfect setup to detect if anyone is attempting to sneak onto your property.

2 – The Explosive Trip Wire Booby Trap

Next up is another alarm based booby trap but uses explosives to create both noise and a flash.

3 – The Sound Grenade Booby Trap

And here’s a third way to set up a perimeter alarm system.

This one is my personal favorite and extremely simple to set up.

First, pick up a few of these new Sound Grenades.

Tie a thin natural colored tripwire to either end and then around nearby trees. This setup will pull the pin on the Sound Grenade. Once the Sound Grenades pin is pulled it will emit an ear piercing 130 dB siren.

Half the battle to defending your home is to be aware when a threat is present.

One of the biggest challenges to SHTF home defense is getting sound sleep. This is no easy task with the constant threat of an ambush.

Placing these tripwires around your property will allow you some much-needed sleep. Because you can rely on them to wake you at the first indication of a trespasser.

Now that you’ve got your alarm booby traps set…it’s time to plan the next level of traps.

Note: Setting up any of the following traps in and around your home is highly illegal.  These examples are for illustrative purposes ONLY to prepare you for SHTF.

Property Booby Traps

4 – The Swinging Log Trap

This booby trap is ideal if you own property with mature trees to work with.

You should use natural obstacles on your properties perimeter to channel threats into a single location (using tall fences, bushes, etc) then add this trap at that location.

5 – The Spring Spear Trap

You can hide this booby trap in a lot of locations on your property.

It can be made much larger if so desired. Obviously, a larger device would create more damage and harm.

6 – The Rock Swing with Spikes Booby Trap

The rock swing with spikes is a simple booby trap to make and would be effective.

Hang this booby trap up high on a tree branch with a tripwire trigger. This device will swing down with speed and injury anybody in its path.

Even if it doesn’t hit its intended target, it would be an excellent deterrent.

Why? Because when someone sees this booby trap swing past them they will think twice about continuing.

Rock Fall With Spikes

7 – The Log Swing With Spikes Trap

Similar to the previous booby trap we covered, but even more lethal.

The wider the log, the less chance of missing the intended target.

Spiked Log

8 – The Spike Pit Booby Traps

You can dig hidden pits in strategic locations on your property. These can be either large or small.

Smaller pits would injure feet when stepped in while larger ones could be deadly.

Spike Pit
Spike Pit 2

Home Defense Booby Traps

If it’s truly SHTF and an intruder makes it past the alarm trips wires.

If he somehow avoids your property booby traps, then you’ll need to rely on some home defense traps set up on your home entrances.

9 – The Simple But Effect Nail Spikes

Nail spikes are easy to make burglar traps and can be used at every entrance location.

These work best when hidden from plain view and can be set up on front porches or outside beneath lower level windows.

Homemade Booby Traps Nail Spikes

10 – Electrocution Window Sills and Door Knobs

Using large batteries and a bit of copper wire you can electrically charge anything metal.

If you set this booby trap up correctly, then anyone who grabs the doorknob or metal window sill will get a nice shock.

The more electrical juice, the bigger the shock.

Here’s a video of this concept done as a prank, but its application for home defense purposes is legit.

Main Entrance Homemade Booby Traps

11 – The Chemical Bucket Drop

Here’s another simple booby trap to set up.

Use a bucket (or old paint can) and add some nasty chemicals to it.

Then position the can above a door on a floating shelf with a wire tied to the can. When the door opens, the can tips, and the chemicals fall onto the intruder.

12 – The Shot Gun Booby Trap

The trigger of a shotgun is set up with the action of opening a door.

The shotgun must be mounted securely for this to work. This is an extremely illegal and deadly booby trap.

It’s not something you should set up under normal circumstances.

Shot Gun Booby Trap

Obviously, you won’t find any videos of this setup in action.

However, here’s a good prank video that gives you an idea of how this booby trap setup would work.

13 – The Ear Piercing Door Stop Alarm

Everyone should have alarm systems at their main entrance locations; front door and back door.

But nobody wants to spend a crazy amount of money on an alarm system and that’s before the monitoring fees.

14 – The Guard Dog

While not technically a homemade booby trap, having a loyal guard dog is another badass way to deter intruders.

The sight and sound of an attacking German Sheppard will keep most sane people away.

German Sheppard

Action Steps To Setting Up Your Homemade Booby Traps

  • Research: Familiarize yourself with what makes a good booby trap and easy to make booby traps. Learn how to make booby traps out of household items.
  • Materials: You can get the alarm materials. Purchase the best materials for your homemade booby trap to make them more effective.
  • Layout: Locate the ideal placements for your booby traps.
  • Practice: Practice making several of these booby traps and test them to ensure they work correctly.

Every survivalist should be prepared to make these homemade traps, but don’t stop there. When SHTF there will be millions of people looking for food, water, and shelter. You need to be prepared to defend what’s yours.

But not only should you booby trap your property, it’s also essential that you learn all the home security and defense measures.

I know the booby traps we covered today are some of the best and most effective ones to defend your property and your home. Yet, that’s only the beginning.

To truly protect and defend what’s your’s you need a comprehensive home security game plan.

A plan that robbers, thieves, and enemy assailants hope you never learn.

How to protect your front door so no man can ever break it down.

85% of home invasions take place at the front door and this simple system will give you 5 simple ways to turn your front door into a hardened barricade.

And an inexpensive trip to your local hardware store will give you everything you need.

A simple flick of a hammer is all it takes to for an intruder to break through your window. You’ll discover the skills to turn your windows into nearly unbreakable panes of “transparent steel.”

One of the easiest places for thieves and intruders to gain access to your home is one that almost no one ever considers a risk. A few simple hidden screws will completely remove this point of entry.

The one place in your home that is made to be broken into by design. Thousands of home invasions happen here but no one thinks to just remove the opportunity for intruders. You can remove this access point completely with a single snip of your scissors if you know where and what to snip.

How to keep criminals and any unwanted visitors from ever sneaking up to your house without you knowing, this is one of my favorite parts.

How to keep a SWAT team from smashing through your doors, walls, and windows whenever they please. And at the same time help law enforcement if you do need them.

What’s the right kind of surveillance equipment and how to use it to actually deter criminals rather than just record them.

How to protect an apartment. Apartments can be difficult to protect by their very nature, you’ll discover the system steps to solve this problem

And that’s just the first few sections…